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Pumpkin Pancakes with Apple Compote

This awakening as to its value has been too tardy, indeed, it has been from a slumber of centuries. Not that good Cookery has not been practised from time immemorial, but its recognition from a scientific point of view is almost within our own day; and even at the present time, dietetics, or that department of medicine which relates to food and diet, is only gradually assuming a position which is destined ultimately to become second to none.

The frequent experience of the housewife living in the country or suburbs these days to receive unexpected visits from friends who are touring in automobiles, and she finds she must have something attractive, dainty and nourishing ready at a moment’s notice to supplement the cup of tea or coffee so welcome after a hot, dusty trip.

It is a wise plan to keep a variety of Summer Sausage on hand, as in a very few minutes delicious sandwiches may be prepared with this, these sandwiches having the charm of novelty. It is impossible to deal in a short article with the many varieties of Summer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thorough understanding of their goodness one must not only read about them but taste them.

Although a meal satisfies your hunger you should have dessert, because the educated palate craves that particular spice as a proper finish. Scientists tell us that a dinner digests better because of a tasty dessert, which, they say, gives the final stimulus necessary to dispose of the food previously received.

The simple desserts are the best desserts, and none is more pleasing to the eye and the palate or so easily made or so frequently served in an imperfect manner, than custards.

With a supply of good eggs in the pantry the cook need never be at a loss for a tasty custard, and if she is wise enough to buy Armour’s Fancy Selects when she orders eggs from her market man their goodness will be reflected in her desserts. Aside from their goodness their extra large size will always recommend their use to the wise housewife. They come packed in an extra large carton. It is a wise plan to keep a variety of Summer Sausage on hand, as in a very few minutes delicious sandwiches may be prepared with this, these sandwiches having the charm of novelty. It is impossible to deal in a short article with the many varieties of Summer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thorough understanding of their goodness one must not only read about them but taste them.

[recipe title=”Pumpkin Pancakes with Apple Compote and Candied Nuts” servings=”4-6″ time=”1hr 15mins” difficulty=”easy”]

Remove from heat and lift out tea bags. Serve warm and store any leftovers in the fridge in an airtight container for up to 10 days.

[recipe-ingredients]

  • 1 cup raw shelled nuts
  • 1/4 cup light brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 teaspoons rosemary
  • 1 teaspoon flake sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon chili flakes

[/recipe-ingredients]

[recipe-directions]

  1. Boil the sugar, water and tartaric acid five minutes. When nearly cold beat into the syrup the whites of the eggs, beaten until foamy, and the flavoring extract. Store in a fruit jar, closely covered. To use, put three tablespoonfuls into a glass half full of cold water, stir in one-fourth a teaspoonful of soda, and drink while effervescing.
  2. A pint of any kind of fruit juice may displace the water, when a teaspoonful of lemon juice should be added to the contents of each glass before stirring in the soda.
  3. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Grate the chocolate, put it in a double boiler with the milk; stir until hot, and add the sugar, vanilla, cinnamon and one pint of the cream. When cold, freeze; when frozen, remove the dasher and stir in the remaining pint of the cream whipped to a stiff froth.
  4. In a large bowl, mix together the flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, and cinnamon. Mash the raspberries; add half the sugar and the lemon juice. Put the remaining sugar and half the cream in a double boiler; stir until the sugar is dissolved, and stand aside to cool; when cold, add the remaining cream, turn the mixture into the freezer, and stir until partly frozen.
  5. Place the pans in the oven and bake for 40-50 minutes, or until they’re golden around the edges. In making pies of juicy fruit, it is a good way to set a small tea-cup on the bottom crust, and lay the fruit all round it. The juice will collect under the cup, and not run out at the edges or top of the pie.

[/recipe-directions]

[recipe-notes]

Tips & Tricks: Fruit pies with lids, should have loaf-sugar grated over them. If they have been baked the day before, they should be warmed in the stove, or near the fire, before they are sent to table, to soften the crust, and make them taste fresh. Raspberry and apple-pies are much improved by taking off the lid, and pouring in a little cream just before they go to table. Replace the lid very carefully. [/recipe-notes]

[/recipe]

Our Food Stories made the pancakes, Christiann made the compote, and I tossed together the candied nuts.If you’re drooling over the beautiful table setting, it’s because we shot this in Laura and Nora’s amazing studio space. The windows were huge and let in so much of the gorgeous soft natural light that the autumn skies are full of.

The counter is full of pear peels, discarded cores, and piles of pretty much every ingredient that went into the tart. Life is messy, and that’s okay. Fear no mess; it just means you’re a normal, functioning human being. At the end of the day, I take an hour (or two depending on how insane things got in the kitchen) to clean it all up.

A stew or a creamed dish is merely a more or less indifferent something to eat when it is dished up any old way and set upon the table. But if it is heaped daintily on a pretty platter, surrounded by a ring of brown mashed potato, its sides decorated by dainty shapes of toasted bread, perhaps buttered and sprinkled with minced parsley, it has become something to awaken the slumbering or indifferent appetite and at practically no extra expense of time or money.

It isn’t essential that every dish should be turned into an elaborate work of art, as if it were to be entered at the annual exhibition of the Société des Chefs de Cuisine, but neither is there any reason, even with modest means at command, for giving cause for that old slogan of the great American dinner table: “It tastes better than it looks.”

 

Fear no mess; it just means you’re a normal, functioning human being.

Marta had come to my workshop in Croatia to lend a hand and is one of the warmest, sweetest, and friendliest people I’ve ever met. And not only that, but she is an incredible cook to boot! After we shot these savory pies they got very cold and I woofed it down since I hadn’t had breakfast that morning, and even chilled these pies tasted insanely good. I can only imagine the heaven that would exist being able to eat one of these guys warm from the oven! Savory pastries are severely underrated, in my opinion, I think they should be as common if not more common than the sweet ones.

It is a wise plan to keep a variety of Summer Sausage on hand, as in a very few minutes delicious sandwiches may be prepared with this, these sandwiches having the charm of novelty. It is impossible to deal in a short article with the many varieties of Summer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thorough understanding of their goodness one must not only read about them but taste them.

They are the staple diet in many foreign countries and in the Armour brand the native flavoring has been done with remarkable faithfulness—so much so that large quantities are shipped from this country every week to the countries where they originated.

After the cream is frozen rather stiff, prepare a tub or bucket of coarsely chopped ice, with one-half less salt than you use for freezing. To each ten pounds of ice allow one quart of rock salt. Sprinkle a little rock salt in the bottom of your bucket or tub, then put over a layer of cracked ice, another layer of salt and cracked ice, and on this stand your mold, which is not filled, but is covered with a lid, and pack it all around, leaving the top, of course, to pack later on. Take your freezer near this tub.

Make sure that your packing tub or bucket has a hole below the top of the mold, so that the salt water will be drained off.

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<p>It is impossible to deal in a short article with the many varieties of Summer Sausage, but there are three or four which can be touched upon. To have a thorough understanding of their goodness one must not only read about them but taste them. They are the staple diet in many foreign countries and in the Armour brand the native flavoring has been done with remarkable faithfulness—so much so that large quantities are shipped from this country every week to the countries where they originated.</p>
<div class=CategoriesPumpkin

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